Bargain Books
You May Be Interested In
Classic Promotion

Beautiful Child

Beautiful Child

美丽小孩

Author
Hayden, Torey L.;  
List Price
RMB Formula
Original Price * Exchange Rate + Tax(13%)
Our Price
You saved
Status
Loading...
Catalog
Education > Special Education > General
Education > Special Education > Learning Disabled
Psychology > Developmental > Child
Publisher
Harpercollins
ISBN-13
9780060508876
ISBN-10
0060508876
Publish
2003-05
Pages
Unit
Size
17.14 * 2.54 * 10.8
Format
Paperback
Version

Product Description

In the tradition of David Pelzer's A Child Called 'It' comes the unsettling story of a mute, almost catatonic seven–year–old and the special education teacher who tries to save her from the silence and abuse of her world.

Hayden has chronicled experiences from her long career as a special education teacher in several books, including One Child and The Tiger's Child. Successes in this difficult and often frustrating field can be few and hard won, a fact which Hayden deftly illustrates while simultaneously offering hope and joy in small victories. This time she brings to life the story of a scruffy seven–year–old, Venus, who is so unresponsive that Hayden searches for signs of deafness, brain damage or mental retardation. The author is relentless in her attempt to diagnose the cause of Venus's 'almost catatonic' state, which is punctuated by occasional violent outbursts. In this first–person narrative, Hayden also shares her own thoughts, worries and reflections on the strained relationship with a mismatched classroom aide, creating a rich tapestry of the dynamics of a group of special needs youngsters and the adults who try to help them.

About the Author

Torey Hayden is an educational psychologist and a former special education teacher who, since 1979, has chronicled her struggles in the classroom in a succession of bestselling books. She currently lives and writes in North Wales, U.K., with her husband and daughter.

Review

“Fresh and compelling...[Hayden] spins out the story with gusto and a storyteller’s art.” (Chicago Tribune )

“Hayden is a fine storyteller.” (Washington Post )

“The world needs more like Torey Hayden.” (Boston Globe )

“A rich tapestry of a group of special needs youngsters and the adults who try to help them.” (Publishers Weekly )

“Torey Hayden gives one hope for the future of public schools, indeed for the future of the human race.” (Harold Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People )

“Page after page proves again the power of love and the resiliency of life.” (Los Angeles Times )

“Moving...as lively and surprising as the kids it so deftly portrays.” (O magazine )

“It has been a long time since you read a book with the emotional impact of One Child.” (New York Times )

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School-A crisply analytical depiction of one year in a special education classroom. Hayden's approach is straightforward and heartwarmingly compassionate not only in its portrayal of the relationships she developed with her students, but also in its appraisal of a philosophical conflict with her teacher's aide and the effect this had on the functioning of the students. The challenge of creating a highly structured, safe, yet sensitive and supportive environment for five children between the ages of six and nine, all with multiple emotional and developmental handicaps, is a study in creativity, perseverance, and keen observation. The author vividly describes her early struggles to inspire bonding among her charges and incremental progress in leading them toward norms of social behavior. The book ultimately focuses on Venus, age seven, whose impoverished and abusive home life frames the backdrop upon which her steps toward trust are poignantly rendered. Twins Shane and Zane, affected by fetal alcohol syndrome; Jesse, afflicted with Tourette's syndrome; and brash and aggressive Billy certainly present a full spectrum of challenges, but it is with Venus that the teacher's most indomitable problem-solving skills are engaged. Insightful and eminently readable, this book will be of particular value to students with a career interest in special education, social services, or counseling.
Lynn Nutwell, Fairfax City Regional Library, VA
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Hayden has chronicled experiences from her long career as a special education teacher in several books, including One Child and The Tiger's Child. Successes in this difficult and often frustrating field can be few and hard-won, which Hayden deftly illustrates while simultaneously offering hope and joy in small victories. This time she brings to life the story of a scruffy seven-year-old, Venus, who is so unresponsive that Hayden searches for signs of deafness, brain damage or mental retardation. Familiar with Venus's siblings, other teachers warn Hayden not to expect much from Venus. Yet the author is relentless in her attempt to diagnose the cause of Venus's "almost catatonic" state, which is punctuated by occasional violent outbursts. Suspecting "elective mutism," a refusal to talk "for psychological reasons," Hayden persists in trying to draw Venus out. Her patient dedication finally pays off when the girl shows an interest in She-Ra, Princess of Power comic books. From there, a story of domestic abuse, removal to foster care and a slow emergence from silent isolation unfolds. However, Venus is not the only fascinating character here. Hayden sets Venus's bittersweet and complex story against the backdrop of other students, including one boy with a very high IQ but behavioral problems, another with Tourette's syndrome and a girl who inexplicably spouts sophisticated poetry and talks to her hand. In this first-person narrative, Hayden also shares her own thoughts, worries and strained relationship with a mismatched classroom aide, creating a rich tapestry of the dynamics of a group of special needs youngsters and the adults who try to help them.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Our encounters with young children are often, if not always, constructed around the idea of encouraging them to talk, to tell us their needs, and to express their feelings and ideas. As we know from psychologists, the development of communication skills (and social connections) comes through trying out language and making connections between words and world. But a child with selective mutism--Venus, the seven-year-old center of Beautiful Child, Hayden's first-person classroom account--is one who does not speak to anyone, keeping silent in all situations. Hayden has written extensively on the topic of special needs and education; this is her eighth book. It is written from a teacher's perspective and paced through a school year. While the narrative regularly returns to Venus, Hayden also tells her story in the context of a tiny special-needs class, and it is vivid telling for any readers who have not lately been to school. The book ultimately shows this kind of teaching to be the tireless embrace of the vulnerable by the devoted. David Carr
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Special education teacher Hayden is known for her powerful stories of children suffering from various forms of child abuse and trauma. Beautiful Child is another such story. As she did in her previous best sellers (Just Another Kid, Ghost Girl, The Tiger's Child), Hayden passionately narrates the story of her work with a special-needs child, Venus an unresponsive, almost catatonic seven-year-old girl. (Hayden also introduces us to the other children in her classroom primarily to Billy, Jesse, and twins Shane and Zane.) Called "beautiful child" by Wanda, the "sister" who brings her to school, Venus is far from beautiful: her appearance is unkempt, and she morphs from a brick wall into a banshee when her space is invaded. Hayden thoughtfully describes her struggles to form this particular class into a cohesive group and the many techniques used to coerce even the smallest response from Venus. Slowly, the class bonds, and even more slowly comes progress with Venus. This inspiring true story is recommended for most special-education as well as psychology collections. Terry Christner, Hutchinson P.L., KS
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.