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ON TOP OF THE WORLD

ON TOP OF THE WORLD

在世界之颠:失落和复兴的故事

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Catalog
Political Science > General
Publisher
Harper Paperbacks
ISBN-13
9780060510305
ISBN-10
0060510307
Publish
2003-08
Pages
304
Unit
Size
* *
Format
Paperback
Version

Product Description

Paperback: 304 pages Publisher: Harper Paperbacks (September 1, 2003) Language: English ISBN: 0060510307 Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.6 x 0.9 inches In the attacks of September 11, 2001, 658 of New York brokerage firm Cantor Fitzgerald's 1,000 New York employees were killed. Immediately following the events, author Tom Barbash traveled to New York to profile his college friend, Cantor CEO Howard Lutnick, and chronicle the firm's struggles to stay in business and help its employees' families. The result, On Top of the World, is a compulsively readable book that is difficult to categorize. Unlike many books about the attacks, its story goes well beyond September 11 and into the following year, helping to better demonstrate the human impact of the catastrophe. And while the book ably describes the horror of the events, it is as much a business study as anything: can a company that trades $200 billion a day in commodities futures survive the sudden death of over 65 percent of its New York employees, and its New York headquarters? Cantor Fitzgerald does endure, but soon Lutnick becomes the center of a media firestorm as Connie Chung, Bill O'Reilly from Fox News, and others question the sincerity of Lutnick's public appearances and denounce his method of compensating the families of those lost. Barbash, a novelist by trade, portrays his friend's struggles sympathetically but also provides well-researched dimension to the other people involved, which helps deepen the human drama of the efforts on the part of all involved to put their lives and their company back together.

About the Author

Tom Barbash met Howard Lutnick when they were both students at Haverford College. After receiving his undergraduate degree, Barbash continued his studies at Iowa Writers Workshop and then to Stanford University where he was awarded a Wallace Stegner Fellowship. His short stories have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Tin House, Story, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Indiana Review. A past winner of the Nelson Algren Award from the Chicago Tribune, he recently received the James Michener Award for his debut novel, The Last Good Chance. He currently teaches writing at Stanford and at San Francisco State University.

Amazon.com Review

In the attacks of September 11, 2001, 658 of New York brokerage firm Cantor Fitzgerald's 1,000 New York employees were killed. Immediately following the events, author Tom Barbash traveled to New York to profile his college friend, Cantor CEO Howard Lutnick, and chronicle the firm's struggles to stay in business and help its employees' families. The result, On Top of the World, is a compulsively readable book that is difficult to categorize. Unlike many books about the attacks, its story goes well beyond September 11 and into the following year, helping to better demonstrate the human impact of the catastrophe. And while the book ably describes the horror of the events, it is as much a business study as anything: can a company that trades $200 billion a day in commodities futures survive the sudden death of over 65 percent of its New York employees, and its New York headquarters? Cantor Fitzgerald does endure, but soon Lutnick becomes the center of a media firestorm as Connie Chung, Bill O'Reilly from Fox News, and others question the sincerity of Lutnick's public appearances and denounce his method of compensating the families of those lost. Barbash, a novelist by trade, portrays his friend's struggles sympathetically but also provides well-researched dimension to the other people involved, which helps deepen the human drama of the efforts on the part of all involved to put their lives and their company back together. --John Moe --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“A sensitive and heartbreaking account....The book has enormous emotional power.” (New York Newsday )

“Written with the urgency of breaking news...The individual stories take one’s breath away.” (Atlanta Journal-Constitution )

“Gripping.” (New York Times Book Review )

From Booklist

Housed in the upper floors of Tower One of the World Trade Center, Cantor Fitzgerald lost 658 employees on September 11, 2001. Only a handful were spared by chance, including the company's chairman, Howard Lutnick, who lived because he had taken his son to his first day of kindergarten that morning. His brother, Gary, and best friend, Doug Gardner, were among those who perished. Much like Triumph over Tragedy (2002), the story of Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc., this story details the event through individual accounts of survival, massive shared loss, and the resurrection of a major Wall Street firm against the greatest odds. At the center of it all is Lutnick, who became embroiled in controversy when, after his tearful television appearance, some of the families of the victims complained publicly that he wasn't doing enough to compensate them for their loss, even though a generous crisis fund was in the works. Barbash, an old friend and former newspaper reporter, gives a sympathetic view of Lutnick, a powerful businessman facing the most extraordinary of personal challenges. David Siegfried
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Cantor Fitzgerald's chair and CEO discusses not just the events of September 11 when nearly 700 members of his firm lost their lives but also the firm's rise to power and the efforts afterward to rethink the future.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.